Title «Quod veterinaria medicina formaliter una eamdemque cum nobiliore hominis medicina sit» Honors and charges for Veterinary in the Constitutions of the Kingdom of Sicily in the XVI century. Abstract From the sixth to the eleventh centuries, European law can be characterized as an age of Sapientia iuris that was transformed in the twelfth century into an age of Scientia iuris. The twelfth century was an age in which not only law but theology, philosophy, and medicine emerged as independent and autonomous academic fields of knowledge. In Sicily, the first law about the exercise of the medical art was the Roger II Constitution (1140): it became imperative «that anyone from that time wish to practice medicine should present to our offices and submit to the judges and their decision». In 1224, Frederick II issued new rules to regulate the medical art. In the sixteenth century they took on more effective mechanisms through the widespread establishment of specific structures such as the protomedicati. The chief physician of Sicily, Antonio d'Alessandro, completed in 1429 the first animal health code of late medieval society. The theory of the chief physician wound through the centuries; then a new impetus was given by G. F. Ingrassia, the governor of the Island health: the health code was reorganized, as well as treatises on anatomy and clinical, police medical texts and a real treaty of veterinary medicine. This Philosophus Siculus, doctissimus medicus, had been a pupil of the most distinguished teachers of his time, especially Andreas Vesalius. He had been named in 1544 professor of anatomy at Naples, in 1554 he came back to Palermo. In 1563 was appointed chief physician of the Kingdom of Sicily by Philip II. In this role, he published the constitutions about medicine, distinguishing between the therapists in order to set fees that applied to the whole Kingdom. So, he had a remarkable role in the juridical and medical debates of his century. The fees of doctors and surgeons were regulated in detail about the quality of performance, value and the titles of doctor, time spent, the distance traveled, the patient's ability to pay, rather than a single visit or over a series. In this respect, both socially and economically important, there was in the constitutions a first mention of the peculiarities of the veterinary, but at the same time was implemented its legal recognition. It was established that veterinarians perceive a fee variable according to the nobility of the animal to be treated. Ingrassia wrote a dissertation on veterinary medicine, in order to confirm that the equality of rights and obligations between veterinary and medical innovation was not only scientific but also legal and relevant in terms of control. The first edition of the Constitutions of 1564 contained this work, marked by a second title: Quod veterinaria medicina formaliter una eamdemque cum nobiliore hominis medicina sit, materiae dumtaxat dignitate seu nobilitate differens etc.. It consisted of fifteen chapters and an appendix. In the first section proposed a series of Quaestiones: the first, if the veterinary medicine was different from Medicine and formally existed as an autonomous science. The thirteenth chapter contained a review of the whole matter and especially treat the fact that veterinarians should be subject to the chief physician and should be recognized and examined by him. The conclusion of the treaty was in the fifteenth chapter. Ingrassia said: «These things then we wrote for the truth…, we approve this for the clarification and protection of the royal jurisdiction of our Protomedicato office. As Your Excellency ... specifically commanded us not to desist from the work already undertaken very useful, both in grooming and instruct them, and also writing these things …as we have promised, that is the perfect medicine for those …under the guidance of God».

«Quod veterinaria medicina formaliter una eamdemque cum nobiliore hominis medicina sit». Onori ed oneri per la veterinaria nelle Costituzioni Protomedicali del Regno di Sicilia del XVI secolo

ALIBRANDI, Rosamaria
2015

Abstract

Title «Quod veterinaria medicina formaliter una eamdemque cum nobiliore hominis medicina sit» Honors and charges for Veterinary in the Constitutions of the Kingdom of Sicily in the XVI century. Abstract From the sixth to the eleventh centuries, European law can be characterized as an age of Sapientia iuris that was transformed in the twelfth century into an age of Scientia iuris. The twelfth century was an age in which not only law but theology, philosophy, and medicine emerged as independent and autonomous academic fields of knowledge. In Sicily, the first law about the exercise of the medical art was the Roger II Constitution (1140): it became imperative «that anyone from that time wish to practice medicine should present to our offices and submit to the judges and their decision». In 1224, Frederick II issued new rules to regulate the medical art. In the sixteenth century they took on more effective mechanisms through the widespread establishment of specific structures such as the protomedicati. The chief physician of Sicily, Antonio d'Alessandro, completed in 1429 the first animal health code of late medieval society. The theory of the chief physician wound through the centuries; then a new impetus was given by G. F. Ingrassia, the governor of the Island health: the health code was reorganized, as well as treatises on anatomy and clinical, police medical texts and a real treaty of veterinary medicine. This Philosophus Siculus, doctissimus medicus, had been a pupil of the most distinguished teachers of his time, especially Andreas Vesalius. He had been named in 1544 professor of anatomy at Naples, in 1554 he came back to Palermo. In 1563 was appointed chief physician of the Kingdom of Sicily by Philip II. In this role, he published the constitutions about medicine, distinguishing between the therapists in order to set fees that applied to the whole Kingdom. So, he had a remarkable role in the juridical and medical debates of his century. The fees of doctors and surgeons were regulated in detail about the quality of performance, value and the titles of doctor, time spent, the distance traveled, the patient's ability to pay, rather than a single visit or over a series. In this respect, both socially and economically important, there was in the constitutions a first mention of the peculiarities of the veterinary, but at the same time was implemented its legal recognition. It was established that veterinarians perceive a fee variable according to the nobility of the animal to be treated. Ingrassia wrote a dissertation on veterinary medicine, in order to confirm that the equality of rights and obligations between veterinary and medical innovation was not only scientific but also legal and relevant in terms of control. The first edition of the Constitutions of 1564 contained this work, marked by a second title: Quod veterinaria medicina formaliter una eamdemque cum nobiliore hominis medicina sit, materiae dumtaxat dignitate seu nobilitate differens etc.. It consisted of fifteen chapters and an appendix. In the first section proposed a series of Quaestiones: the first, if the veterinary medicine was different from Medicine and formally existed as an autonomous science. The thirteenth chapter contained a review of the whole matter and especially treat the fact that veterinarians should be subject to the chief physician and should be recognized and examined by him. The conclusion of the treaty was in the fifteenth chapter. Ingrassia said: «These things then we wrote for the truth…, we approve this for the clarification and protection of the royal jurisdiction of our Protomedicato office. As Your Excellency ... specifically commanded us not to desist from the work already undertaken very useful, both in grooming and instruct them, and also writing these things …as we have promised, that is the perfect medicine for those …under the guidance of God».
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.
Pubblicazioni consigliate

Caricamento pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11570/2711768
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact