Information and computer technology (ICT) has a close–on 70–year history in education (Roblyer, Edwards, 2000), while other kinds of technology have, of course, been in use for much longer; it is thus appropriate to understand computers’ contribution to a permanent learning by reconstructing where life long learning (LLL) has come from and where it is going. The relationship between “LLL” and “ICT” can be summarised in the following words “Tech- nology can make life long learning a reality” (Reagan, 1998: 43): people with electronic devices can learn virtually anytime and any place without obstacles in place, time and social status. The overview of the development of ICT provided in this study is intended for analysing the potential impact that social media in general can have on education and how social media can further be involved in education in order to modernise educational systems and to increase quality, equity and personalisation in the provision of lifelong learning for all (European Commission, 2006, 2007a), if we want the EU become “the most competitive economy in the world” in accordance with the Lisbon strategy.

Social Media at the heart of lifelong learning

ROSALBA RIZZO
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
FABIO FRAGOMENI
Resources
2018

Abstract

Information and computer technology (ICT) has a close–on 70–year history in education (Roblyer, Edwards, 2000), while other kinds of technology have, of course, been in use for much longer; it is thus appropriate to understand computers’ contribution to a permanent learning by reconstructing where life long learning (LLL) has come from and where it is going. The relationship between “LLL” and “ICT” can be summarised in the following words “Tech- nology can make life long learning a reality” (Reagan, 1998: 43): people with electronic devices can learn virtually anytime and any place without obstacles in place, time and social status. The overview of the development of ICT provided in this study is intended for analysing the potential impact that social media in general can have on education and how social media can further be involved in education in order to modernise educational systems and to increase quality, equity and personalisation in the provision of lifelong learning for all (European Commission, 2006, 2007a), if we want the EU become “the most competitive economy in the world” in accordance with the Lisbon strategy.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11570/3146626
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