A great body of research has underlined the role of individuation as a key developmental factor during adolescence (Bray, Adams, Getz, & McQueen, 2001; Grotevant & Cooper, 1986; Youniss & Smollar, 1985). This process seems to be characterized by the interplay of two different dimensions: individuality and relatedness. On the one hand, individuation includes the ability to operate in an autonomous and self-directed manner without being controlled or impaired by significant others. On the other hand, individuation reflects one???s ability to have close, intimate relationships with family members while maintaining autonomy. In this perspective, the achievement of a state of ???autonomous-relatedness??? (Bowlby cited in Murphey, Silber, Coelho, Hamburg, & Greenberg, 1963) is an optimal outcome for the adolescent-parent relationship (Allen, Hauser, Bell, & O???Connor, 1994). In the last years, several studies have investigated individual differences in the patterns of autonomy and connectedness in the relationship of adolescents with their parents (Beyers, Goossens, & van Calster, 2000; Delaney, 1996; Ingoglia, Lo Coco, Pace, Zappulla, Liga, & Inguglia, 2004, 2005; Lamborn & Steinberg, 1993; Lee & Bell, 2003). In general, results have shown the presence of four relational profiles ??? Individuated, Detached, Connected and Ambivalent. Individuated adolescents (highly autonomous and supported from parents) show high levels of academic competence, and psychosocial adjustment, but even high levels of internal distress. Connected adolescents (lowly autonomous but highly supported from parents) report high levels of academic competence, and low levels of psychological maladjustment. Detached adolescents (highly autonomous but lowly supported from parents) report low levels of psychosocial development and academic competence, and high levels of psychological maladjustment. Finally, Ambivalent youngsters (lowly autonomous and supported from parents) report low levels of psychosocial development and academic competence, and low levels of internal distress. Nevertheless, there is a lack of longitudinal studies on the individual differences in the patterns of autonomy and relatedness.

A Longitudinal Study on Patterns of Autonomy and Relatedness in the Parent-Adolescent Relationship

LIGA, FRANCESCA
2006

Abstract

A great body of research has underlined the role of individuation as a key developmental factor during adolescence (Bray, Adams, Getz, & McQueen, 2001; Grotevant & Cooper, 1986; Youniss & Smollar, 1985). This process seems to be characterized by the interplay of two different dimensions: individuality and relatedness. On the one hand, individuation includes the ability to operate in an autonomous and self-directed manner without being controlled or impaired by significant others. On the other hand, individuation reflects one???s ability to have close, intimate relationships with family members while maintaining autonomy. In this perspective, the achievement of a state of ???autonomous-relatedness??? (Bowlby cited in Murphey, Silber, Coelho, Hamburg, & Greenberg, 1963) is an optimal outcome for the adolescent-parent relationship (Allen, Hauser, Bell, & O???Connor, 1994). In the last years, several studies have investigated individual differences in the patterns of autonomy and connectedness in the relationship of adolescents with their parents (Beyers, Goossens, & van Calster, 2000; Delaney, 1996; Ingoglia, Lo Coco, Pace, Zappulla, Liga, & Inguglia, 2004, 2005; Lamborn & Steinberg, 1993; Lee & Bell, 2003). In general, results have shown the presence of four relational profiles ??? Individuated, Detached, Connected and Ambivalent. Individuated adolescents (highly autonomous and supported from parents) show high levels of academic competence, and psychosocial adjustment, but even high levels of internal distress. Connected adolescents (lowly autonomous but highly supported from parents) report high levels of academic competence, and low levels of psychological maladjustment. Detached adolescents (highly autonomous but lowly supported from parents) report low levels of psychosocial development and academic competence, and high levels of psychological maladjustment. Finally, Ambivalent youngsters (lowly autonomous and supported from parents) report low levels of psychosocial development and academic competence, and low levels of internal distress. Nevertheless, there is a lack of longitudinal studies on the individual differences in the patterns of autonomy and relatedness.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11570/3048190
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