Analgesic and sedative effects of romifidine followed by tramadol administered intravenously either as a bolus injection or a slow infusion in calves undergoing umbilical hernia repair Giovanna Costa 1, Ignacio Lizarraga2 , Fabio Leonardi3, Sebastian Mignacca4, Rosalia Crupi 1, Enrico Gugliandolo1, Filippo Spadola1 . 1 Department of Veterinary Science, University of Messina, 98169 Messina, Sicily, Italy. 2 School of Veterinary Science, Massey University, Private Bag 11 222, Palmerston North, 4442, New Zealand. 3 Department of Veterinary Science, University of Parma, Emilia-Romagna, Italy. 4Veterinary practitioner , Italy. * Corresponding author: E-mail: glcosta@unime.it Department of Veterinary Science, University of Messina, Polo Universitario SS. Annunziata, 98169 Messina, Italy. Phone +390903503684 Abstract Background/ Objectives and Goals To compare the analgesic and sedative effects induced by romifidine followed by tramadol (little used in calves) administered intravenously either as a bolus injection or a slow infusion in calves. Methods Study protocols were approved by our Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee University of Messina, protocol 027/2018. Twenty Frisian calves undergoing umbilical hernia repair. All calves were locally infiltrated with lidocaine (4 mg/kg) and administered romifidine (0.08 mg/kg IM; time 0) followed 5 minutes later by tramadol (1 mg/kg IV) either as a bolus (n = 10) or a slow infusion (n = 10). Hear rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), systolic arterial pressure (SAP), sedation scores and intraoperative pain scores were obtained for up to 55 minutes, and postoperative pain scores were assessed for up to 50 minutes after the calves regained a standing position. Results At various time points and compared to baseline values, HR decreased in both groups, and both RR and SAP increased and decreased in the bolus and the slow infusion groups, respectively (p ≤ 0.0376). These parameters were different between groups at various time points including at baseline (p < 0.05). Sedation was similar in both groups and only at 55 minutes sedation scores were higher in the infusion than in the bolus group (p <.05). Intraoperative pain scores were higher in the bolus than in the infusion group (p < 0.5). Postoperative pain scores were similar between groups (p > 0.5). Conclusions and clinical relevance Compared to bolus administration, the slow infusion of tramadol yielded lower intraoperative pain scores and, at the end of the surgical period, higher sedation scores.. Local lidocaine infiltration and IM romifidine followed by IV tramadol, as a bolus or slow infusion, provided adequate sedation and analgesia to safely and humanely perform umbilical hernia repair in calves. Keywords Cattle; Intravenous infusion; Pain; Romifidine; Surgery; Tramadol. Biography Giovanna Costa Giovanna Costa in 1999 she graduated in Veterinary Medicine, University of Messina has completed his PhD at the age of 29 years from University of Messina. He is professor and director of a research team focusing on anaesthesiology. He has published more than 22 papers in reputed journals and serving as an editorial board member of repute.

Analgesic and sedative effects of romifidinefollowed by tramadol administered intravenously either as a bolus injection or a slow infusion in calves undergoing umbilical hernia repair

Giovanna Costa
;
Rosalia Crupi;Enrico Gugliandolo;Filippo Spadola
2021

Abstract

Analgesic and sedative effects of romifidine followed by tramadol administered intravenously either as a bolus injection or a slow infusion in calves undergoing umbilical hernia repair Giovanna Costa 1, Ignacio Lizarraga2 , Fabio Leonardi3, Sebastian Mignacca4, Rosalia Crupi 1, Enrico Gugliandolo1, Filippo Spadola1 . 1 Department of Veterinary Science, University of Messina, 98169 Messina, Sicily, Italy. 2 School of Veterinary Science, Massey University, Private Bag 11 222, Palmerston North, 4442, New Zealand. 3 Department of Veterinary Science, University of Parma, Emilia-Romagna, Italy. 4Veterinary practitioner , Italy. * Corresponding author: E-mail: glcosta@unime.it Department of Veterinary Science, University of Messina, Polo Universitario SS. Annunziata, 98169 Messina, Italy. Phone +390903503684 Abstract Background/ Objectives and Goals To compare the analgesic and sedative effects induced by romifidine followed by tramadol (little used in calves) administered intravenously either as a bolus injection or a slow infusion in calves. Methods Study protocols were approved by our Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee University of Messina, protocol 027/2018. Twenty Frisian calves undergoing umbilical hernia repair. All calves were locally infiltrated with lidocaine (4 mg/kg) and administered romifidine (0.08 mg/kg IM; time 0) followed 5 minutes later by tramadol (1 mg/kg IV) either as a bolus (n = 10) or a slow infusion (n = 10). Hear rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), systolic arterial pressure (SAP), sedation scores and intraoperative pain scores were obtained for up to 55 minutes, and postoperative pain scores were assessed for up to 50 minutes after the calves regained a standing position. Results At various time points and compared to baseline values, HR decreased in both groups, and both RR and SAP increased and decreased in the bolus and the slow infusion groups, respectively (p ≤ 0.0376). These parameters were different between groups at various time points including at baseline (p < 0.05). Sedation was similar in both groups and only at 55 minutes sedation scores were higher in the infusion than in the bolus group (p <.05). Intraoperative pain scores were higher in the bolus than in the infusion group (p < 0.5). Postoperative pain scores were similar between groups (p > 0.5). Conclusions and clinical relevance Compared to bolus administration, the slow infusion of tramadol yielded lower intraoperative pain scores and, at the end of the surgical period, higher sedation scores.. Local lidocaine infiltration and IM romifidine followed by IV tramadol, as a bolus or slow infusion, provided adequate sedation and analgesia to safely and humanely perform umbilical hernia repair in calves. Keywords Cattle; Intravenous infusion; Pain; Romifidine; Surgery; Tramadol. Biography Giovanna Costa Giovanna Costa in 1999 she graduated in Veterinary Medicine, University of Messina has completed his PhD at the age of 29 years from University of Messina. He is professor and director of a research team focusing on anaesthesiology. He has published more than 22 papers in reputed journals and serving as an editorial board member of repute.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11570/3207556
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