Abstract: Background/Purpose: A few studies have taken into account the diaphragmatic function in patients successfully treated for congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). Monodimensional sonography has been reported to be useful in assessing the diaphragmatic motility. Aim of the present study was to investigate, in a long-term follow-up, the diaphragmatic function after CDH repair. Methods: Ten patients, with a mean age of 16 (5-26) years, were enrolled. All had had a left diaphragmatic hernia repaired, but no one received a patch. Ten subjects of matched age were used as controls. The diaphragmatic excursions appear, at M-mode sonography, as a sinusoid; the amplitude of the curve on the vertical axis measured the movement in centimeters. Chest x-ray and spirometry were also performed in CDH patients. Results: A reduced diaphragmatic motility on the left (treated) side was recorded. The amplitude of the contraction was significantly reduced when compared with the contralateral side (1.19 +/- 0.2 vs 2.33 +/- 0.9 cm; P =.017) and was also significantly reduced in comparison with the motion of the left side of controls (1.19 +/- 0.2 vs 1.83 +/- 0:4 cm; P =.01). There was no difference in the amplitude of contraction between the left, and right sides of control patients and between the right side of CDH patients and the controls. Spirometry was normal in all patients but one, who had a slight reduction of ventilation on the left side. Conclusion: M-mode sonography appears as a very useful tool in quantitative evaluation of diaphragmatic movements and should be extensively used during follow-up of patients after CDH repair. Motility of the repaired diaphragmatic is reduced, even after a long period, but this does not affect the respiratory function in patients who survived CDH repair. (c) 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Long-term functional evaluation of diaphragmatic motility after repair ofcongenital diaphragmatic hernia

ARENA, Francesco;ROMEO, Carmelo;CALABRO', Maria Pia;ANTONUCCIO, Pietro;ARENA, SALVATORE;ROMEO, Giuseppe
2005

Abstract

Abstract: Background/Purpose: A few studies have taken into account the diaphragmatic function in patients successfully treated for congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). Monodimensional sonography has been reported to be useful in assessing the diaphragmatic motility. Aim of the present study was to investigate, in a long-term follow-up, the diaphragmatic function after CDH repair. Methods: Ten patients, with a mean age of 16 (5-26) years, were enrolled. All had had a left diaphragmatic hernia repaired, but no one received a patch. Ten subjects of matched age were used as controls. The diaphragmatic excursions appear, at M-mode sonography, as a sinusoid; the amplitude of the curve on the vertical axis measured the movement in centimeters. Chest x-ray and spirometry were also performed in CDH patients. Results: A reduced diaphragmatic motility on the left (treated) side was recorded. The amplitude of the contraction was significantly reduced when compared with the contralateral side (1.19 +/- 0.2 vs 2.33 +/- 0.9 cm; P =.017) and was also significantly reduced in comparison with the motion of the left side of controls (1.19 +/- 0.2 vs 1.83 +/- 0:4 cm; P =.01). There was no difference in the amplitude of contraction between the left, and right sides of control patients and between the right side of CDH patients and the controls. Spirometry was normal in all patients but one, who had a slight reduction of ventilation on the left side. Conclusion: M-mode sonography appears as a very useful tool in quantitative evaluation of diaphragmatic movements and should be extensively used during follow-up of patients after CDH repair. Motility of the repaired diaphragmatic is reduced, even after a long period, but this does not affect the respiratory function in patients who survived CDH repair. (c) 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.
Pubblicazioni consigliate

Caricamento pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11570/1433922
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 1
  • Scopus 13
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 10
social impact