The development of potential neuroprotective therapies for neurodegenerative diseases (Parkinson's and Alzheimer's Disease) must be based on understanding their molecular and biochemical pathogenesis. Many potential pathways of neuronal cell death have been implicated in a mouse model of neurodegenerative disease, including excitotoxicity, toxicity from reactive oxygen species (superoxide anion, nitric oxide, hydroxyl radical), apoptosis (caspase-dependent and -independent pathways), necrosis and glial injury. Some agents that act on these pathways may be available for protecting the brain against chronic neurodegenerative conditions like Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. Drugs currently used to treat neurological disease and injuries provide temporary relief of symptoms but do not stop or slow the underlying neurodegenerative process. Restorative therapies for Parkinson's Disease are currently focused on cell replacement and administration of growth factors and small-molecule neurotrophic agents. The new experimental drugs, by contrast, target the common, underlying cause of destructive process of brain cell death. For example, p53 inhibitors attack a key protein involved in nerve cell death and represent a new strategy for preserving brain function following sudden injury or chronic disease. Analogues of pifithrin-alpha (PFT), which was shown in previous studies to inhibit p53, were designed, synthesized and tested to see whether they would work against cultured brain cells and animal models of neurodegenerative disease. Moreover, several agents based on the predominant anti-amyloid strategy, targeting amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide, which aggregates in the plaques that are a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease, would affect disease progression. Researchers are already making great strides in developing a vaccine for this progressive brain disorder. Immunization could offer a way to blunt or even prevent the deadly, memory-robbing disease. Here we review many of potential neuroprotective therapies, and strategies that might be suited to the development of innovative approaches that prevent degeneration and restore function in Parkinson's disease.

New therapeutic strategy for Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease.

ESPOSITO, EMANUELA;CUZZOCREA, Salvatore
2010

Abstract

The development of potential neuroprotective therapies for neurodegenerative diseases (Parkinson's and Alzheimer's Disease) must be based on understanding their molecular and biochemical pathogenesis. Many potential pathways of neuronal cell death have been implicated in a mouse model of neurodegenerative disease, including excitotoxicity, toxicity from reactive oxygen species (superoxide anion, nitric oxide, hydroxyl radical), apoptosis (caspase-dependent and -independent pathways), necrosis and glial injury. Some agents that act on these pathways may be available for protecting the brain against chronic neurodegenerative conditions like Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. Drugs currently used to treat neurological disease and injuries provide temporary relief of symptoms but do not stop or slow the underlying neurodegenerative process. Restorative therapies for Parkinson's Disease are currently focused on cell replacement and administration of growth factors and small-molecule neurotrophic agents. The new experimental drugs, by contrast, target the common, underlying cause of destructive process of brain cell death. For example, p53 inhibitors attack a key protein involved in nerve cell death and represent a new strategy for preserving brain function following sudden injury or chronic disease. Analogues of pifithrin-alpha (PFT), which was shown in previous studies to inhibit p53, were designed, synthesized and tested to see whether they would work against cultured brain cells and animal models of neurodegenerative disease. Moreover, several agents based on the predominant anti-amyloid strategy, targeting amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide, which aggregates in the plaques that are a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease, would affect disease progression. Researchers are already making great strides in developing a vaccine for this progressive brain disorder. Immunization could offer a way to blunt or even prevent the deadly, memory-robbing disease. Here we review many of potential neuroprotective therapies, and strategies that might be suited to the development of innovative approaches that prevent degeneration and restore function in Parkinson's disease.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.
Pubblicazioni consigliate

Caricamento pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11570/1910808
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 22
  • Scopus 57
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact