Traumatic brain injury is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in adults and children in the United States. Despite steady improvement in our understanding of the pathophysiology of acquired brain injuries, there has been remarkably little improvement in brain injury therapies and/or pharmacologic treatments over the past decade. One of the reasons may be the inability to properly stratify subjects for clinical trials and/or to have real-time assessment of the effectiveness of a given intervention. It has been recognized for several decades that serum biomarkers may allow for more objective subject stratification as well as act as surrogate markers of treatment efficacy. Despite numerous studies, however, biomarkers are not currently part of clinical practice in either acquired brain injury or other neurologic or musculoskeletal disorders. The goals of this review article, therefore, are to use traumatic brain injury as a example to discuss the use of biomarkers in clinical and randomized controlled trials; to briefly discuss the field of neuroproteomics and its interface with neurologic interventions; and to provide an overview of the collaborative pathway between academia and industry, which needs to be an integral part of the translation of biomarkers from the bench to the bedside in any clinical population. Introduction of the concept of rehabilomics and implications of biomarker use for the physical medicine and rehabilitation physician also are discussed.

Translating biomarkers research to clinical care: applications and issues for rehabilomics.

MONDELLO, STEFANIA;
2011

Abstract

Traumatic brain injury is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in adults and children in the United States. Despite steady improvement in our understanding of the pathophysiology of acquired brain injuries, there has been remarkably little improvement in brain injury therapies and/or pharmacologic treatments over the past decade. One of the reasons may be the inability to properly stratify subjects for clinical trials and/or to have real-time assessment of the effectiveness of a given intervention. It has been recognized for several decades that serum biomarkers may allow for more objective subject stratification as well as act as surrogate markers of treatment efficacy. Despite numerous studies, however, biomarkers are not currently part of clinical practice in either acquired brain injury or other neurologic or musculoskeletal disorders. The goals of this review article, therefore, are to use traumatic brain injury as a example to discuss the use of biomarkers in clinical and randomized controlled trials; to briefly discuss the field of neuroproteomics and its interface with neurologic interventions; and to provide an overview of the collaborative pathway between academia and industry, which needs to be an integral part of the translation of biomarkers from the bench to the bedside in any clinical population. Introduction of the concept of rehabilomics and implications of biomarker use for the physical medicine and rehabilitation physician also are discussed.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11570/1912891
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