Haematological parameters are valuable indicators of fish health status. This study is aimed to provide baseline data of the blood profile of two teleost fish species living in different environments and with divergent feeding behaviour, namely the flathead grey mullet Mugil cephalus Linnaeus, 1758, a marine herbivorous fish, and the goldfish Carassius auratus (Linnaeus, 1758), a freshwater omnivorous fish. Using an automated system coupled with flow cytometry and light microscopy, significant variations were found between M. cephalus and C. auratus blood parameters, except for haemoglobin concentration (Hgb). A significant increase in red blood cell count (RBC) and haematocrit (Hct) levels, associated with reduced mean corpuscular volume (MCV), was revealed in mullets in respect to goldfish. These data may be attributable to differences in fish species, or to their divergent physiological activeness as high RBC values are associated with fast movement and high activity with streamlined bodies, or to environmental factors such as water salinity, an increase in which may lead to erythropoiesis as an adaptive process in seawater fish. Additionally, lower values of white blood cell count (WBC) and thrombocyte count (TC) were recorded in mullets with respect to goldfish, and these changes may be due to divergent feeding habits of the two fish species, or to their different environments since increased salinity may inversely affect WBC. Overall, findings from this study provide a better understanding of the influences of divergent environmental conditions and feeding habits on fish blood parameters. The combined use of an automatic haematological count with flow cytometry was demonstrated to be effective for an early assessment of blood parameters in different fish species.

Comparative study of haematology of two teleost fish (Mugil cephalus and Carassius auratus) from different environments and feeding habits

Vincenzo Parrino
Co-primo
;
Tiziana Cappello
Co-primo
;
Gregorio Costa;Carmela Cannavà;Marilena Sanfilippo;Francesco Fazio
Penultimo
;
Salvatore Fasulo
Ultimo
2018-01-01

Abstract

Haematological parameters are valuable indicators of fish health status. This study is aimed to provide baseline data of the blood profile of two teleost fish species living in different environments and with divergent feeding behaviour, namely the flathead grey mullet Mugil cephalus Linnaeus, 1758, a marine herbivorous fish, and the goldfish Carassius auratus (Linnaeus, 1758), a freshwater omnivorous fish. Using an automated system coupled with flow cytometry and light microscopy, significant variations were found between M. cephalus and C. auratus blood parameters, except for haemoglobin concentration (Hgb). A significant increase in red blood cell count (RBC) and haematocrit (Hct) levels, associated with reduced mean corpuscular volume (MCV), was revealed in mullets in respect to goldfish. These data may be attributable to differences in fish species, or to their divergent physiological activeness as high RBC values are associated with fast movement and high activity with streamlined bodies, or to environmental factors such as water salinity, an increase in which may lead to erythropoiesis as an adaptive process in seawater fish. Additionally, lower values of white blood cell count (WBC) and thrombocyte count (TC) were recorded in mullets with respect to goldfish, and these changes may be due to divergent feeding habits of the two fish species, or to their different environments since increased salinity may inversely affect WBC. Overall, findings from this study provide a better understanding of the influences of divergent environmental conditions and feeding habits on fish blood parameters. The combined use of an automatic haematological count with flow cytometry was demonstrated to be effective for an early assessment of blood parameters in different fish species.
2018
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11570/3125541
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