Background: Rome IV criteria for functional gastrointestinal disorders state that children suspected of having Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) with Constipation (IBS-C) should be preliminarily treated for constipation. We aimed at verifying if functional constipation may indeed lead to an erroneous diagnosis of IBS with diarrhea (IBS-D) or IBS with mixed pattern of diarrhea and constipation (IBS-M). Methods: We prospectively enrolled in an unblinded fashion 10 and 16 consecutive children referred to our center who met Rome IV criteria for a diagnosis of IBS-D and IBS-M, respectively. Patients who fulfilled criteria for suspect "occult constipation" were then given a bowel cleaning regimen with Polyethylene glycol 3350, re-evaluated at 2 months and followed up for at least 6 months. Sixteen additional patients with IBS with Constipation (IBS-C) referred in the same period served as control. The endpoints were: 1) a decrease of more than 50% in abdominal pain intensity and frequency scores; and 2) for patients with IBS-D and IBS-M: resolution of diarrhea. Results: The endpoints were met by 8 (80%) and 14 (87%) of the patients with IBS-D and IBS-M, respectively, with decrease of abdominal pain and resolution of "diarrhea". The response was not significantly different from that observed in 15 (93%) of the IBS-C control group. Conclusion: Acknowledging the limitations of the small number of patients and of the uncontrolled nature of the study, we suggest that a possibly large number of patients labeled as IBS-D or IBS-M may actually simply present functional constipation and should be managed as such.

Functional constipation masked as irritable bowel syndrome

Salamone I.;Pellegrino S.;Costa S.;Pallio S.;Magazzu' G.
;
2020-01-01

Abstract

Background: Rome IV criteria for functional gastrointestinal disorders state that children suspected of having Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) with Constipation (IBS-C) should be preliminarily treated for constipation. We aimed at verifying if functional constipation may indeed lead to an erroneous diagnosis of IBS with diarrhea (IBS-D) or IBS with mixed pattern of diarrhea and constipation (IBS-M). Methods: We prospectively enrolled in an unblinded fashion 10 and 16 consecutive children referred to our center who met Rome IV criteria for a diagnosis of IBS-D and IBS-M, respectively. Patients who fulfilled criteria for suspect "occult constipation" were then given a bowel cleaning regimen with Polyethylene glycol 3350, re-evaluated at 2 months and followed up for at least 6 months. Sixteen additional patients with IBS with Constipation (IBS-C) referred in the same period served as control. The endpoints were: 1) a decrease of more than 50% in abdominal pain intensity and frequency scores; and 2) for patients with IBS-D and IBS-M: resolution of diarrhea. Results: The endpoints were met by 8 (80%) and 14 (87%) of the patients with IBS-D and IBS-M, respectively, with decrease of abdominal pain and resolution of "diarrhea". The response was not significantly different from that observed in 15 (93%) of the IBS-C control group. Conclusion: Acknowledging the limitations of the small number of patients and of the uncontrolled nature of the study, we suggest that a possibly large number of patients labeled as IBS-D or IBS-M may actually simply present functional constipation and should be managed as such.
2020
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11570/3163630
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