Introduction: Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a heterogeneous condition characterized by largely variable phenotypic expressions. Previous findings suggested that gender may be a relevant factor in mediating this heterogeneity. The present study aimed at exploring gender differences in a large clinical sample of Italian OCD patients. Methods: Socio-demographic and clinical variables of a sample of 229 consecutive OCD outpatients were included in a common database. Patients were assessed through structured clinical interviews, the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS) and the Clinical Global Impression (CGI) scale. Results: Female OCD patients were more likely than males to have lifetime psychiatric comorbidities (72.6% vs 56.9%; p < 0.05), poly-comorbidities being twice as high compared to males. The female group also showed a significant later onset of symptoms (63.7% vs 44.8%; p < 0.005) and a higher age at first treatment (30.98 ± 13.1 years vs 27.81 ± 11.3; p < 0.005). Moreover, the female subgroup presented higher rates of cleaning and washing compulsions, compared to the male subgroup (28.7% vs 12.6% in the male group; p < 0.005). Conclusions: The current study supports the notion that OCD in female gender is frequently a comorbid condition with other specific clinical characteristics compared to male patients. These findings should be considered in epidemiologic and therapeutic perspectives.

Clinical characteristics and comorbidity associated with female gender in obsessive-compulsive disorder

Celebre, Laura
Secondo
;
Bruno, Antonio;
2020-01-01

Abstract

Introduction: Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a heterogeneous condition characterized by largely variable phenotypic expressions. Previous findings suggested that gender may be a relevant factor in mediating this heterogeneity. The present study aimed at exploring gender differences in a large clinical sample of Italian OCD patients. Methods: Socio-demographic and clinical variables of a sample of 229 consecutive OCD outpatients were included in a common database. Patients were assessed through structured clinical interviews, the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS) and the Clinical Global Impression (CGI) scale. Results: Female OCD patients were more likely than males to have lifetime psychiatric comorbidities (72.6% vs 56.9%; p < 0.05), poly-comorbidities being twice as high compared to males. The female group also showed a significant later onset of symptoms (63.7% vs 44.8%; p < 0.005) and a higher age at first treatment (30.98 ± 13.1 years vs 27.81 ± 11.3; p < 0.005). Moreover, the female subgroup presented higher rates of cleaning and washing compulsions, compared to the male subgroup (28.7% vs 12.6% in the male group; p < 0.005). Conclusions: The current study supports the notion that OCD in female gender is frequently a comorbid condition with other specific clinical characteristics compared to male patients. These findings should be considered in epidemiologic and therapeutic perspectives.
2020
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11570/3176457
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