While many studies have been conducted on drug-inducing alterations in the aquatic environment, little is known about their interaction with climate change, such as rising temperatures. To increase knowledge on this topic, Mytilus galloprovincialis mussels were exposed to two different temperatures 17 ± 1 °C (control) and 21 ± 1 °C in the absence and presence of salicylic acid (SA) (4 mg/L) for 28 days. Salicylic acid in the water and tissues was measured and its impact reported through biomarker responses including: energy metabolism (electron transport system (ETS) activity, glycogen (GLY), protein (PROT) and lipids (LIP) contents), oxidative stress markers (activity of the enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx)), glutathione balance between the reduced and the oxidized forms (GSH/GSSG), and damage to membrane lipids (lipid peroxidation - LPO). The mussels responded differently if the stresses imposed were single or combined, with greater impacts when both stressors were acting together. Contaminated mussels exposed to high temperatures were unable to increase their metabolic capacity to restore their defence mechanisms, reducing the expenditure of LIP. In the presence of SA and increased temperature antioxidant defences respond differently, with higher SOD levels and inhibition of CAT. The present study highlights not only the negative impact of warming and SA, but especially how temperature increase will promote the impact of SA in M. galloprovincialis, which under predicted climate change scenarios may greatly impair population maintenance and ecosystem biodiversity.

Impacts of salicylic acid in Mytilus galloprovincialis exposed to warming conditions

Silvestro S.
Secondo
;
Pagano M.;Faggio C.
Ultimo
2020-01-01

Abstract

While many studies have been conducted on drug-inducing alterations in the aquatic environment, little is known about their interaction with climate change, such as rising temperatures. To increase knowledge on this topic, Mytilus galloprovincialis mussels were exposed to two different temperatures 17 ± 1 °C (control) and 21 ± 1 °C in the absence and presence of salicylic acid (SA) (4 mg/L) for 28 days. Salicylic acid in the water and tissues was measured and its impact reported through biomarker responses including: energy metabolism (electron transport system (ETS) activity, glycogen (GLY), protein (PROT) and lipids (LIP) contents), oxidative stress markers (activity of the enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx)), glutathione balance between the reduced and the oxidized forms (GSH/GSSG), and damage to membrane lipids (lipid peroxidation - LPO). The mussels responded differently if the stresses imposed were single or combined, with greater impacts when both stressors were acting together. Contaminated mussels exposed to high temperatures were unable to increase their metabolic capacity to restore their defence mechanisms, reducing the expenditure of LIP. In the presence of SA and increased temperature antioxidant defences respond differently, with higher SOD levels and inhibition of CAT. The present study highlights not only the negative impact of warming and SA, but especially how temperature increase will promote the impact of SA in M. galloprovincialis, which under predicted climate change scenarios may greatly impair population maintenance and ecosystem biodiversity.
2020
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11570/3184451
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