Background: Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) represent 85% of all mesenchymal neoplasms that affect the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. These GISTs range in size from small lesions to large masses. Often they are clinically silent until they reach a significant size, so their discovery is usually incidental.Case presentation: A 67-year-old man was admitted at our general surgery department with a persistent abdominal pain in the left hypochondrium, associated with nausea and vomiting. Clinical examination revealed a palpable mass in the epigastrium and in the left hypochondrium, which was approximately 40 cm long. Ultrasonography and computed tomography of the abdomen showed a large mass of 40 × 25 cm, which extended from the posterior wall of the stomach to the spleen, involving the body and the tail of the pancreas. The patient underwent en-block resection of the mass, sleeve resection of the stomach, and distal pancreatectomy-splenectomy. The histopathology of the resected specimen was consistent with a gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the stomach (positive for CD 117) with a high risk of malignancy (mitotic count >5/50 high-power fieldand Ki67/Mib1 >10%). The postoperative course was uneventful and treatment with imatinib mesylate began immediately. The patient appears to be disease free after four years.Conclusions: Giant GISTs of the stomach are rare. Surgical resection with curative intent is feasible. The combination of surgical resection and imatinib can provide long-termdisease-free survival. An R0 resection is the best achievable treatment, therefore the patient should be evaluated over time for potential resectability. © 2013 Cappellani et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

Giant gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) of the stomach cause of high bowel obstruction: Surgical management

Berretta M.
2013-01-01

Abstract

Background: Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) represent 85% of all mesenchymal neoplasms that affect the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. These GISTs range in size from small lesions to large masses. Often they are clinically silent until they reach a significant size, so their discovery is usually incidental.Case presentation: A 67-year-old man was admitted at our general surgery department with a persistent abdominal pain in the left hypochondrium, associated with nausea and vomiting. Clinical examination revealed a palpable mass in the epigastrium and in the left hypochondrium, which was approximately 40 cm long. Ultrasonography and computed tomography of the abdomen showed a large mass of 40 × 25 cm, which extended from the posterior wall of the stomach to the spleen, involving the body and the tail of the pancreas. The patient underwent en-block resection of the mass, sleeve resection of the stomach, and distal pancreatectomy-splenectomy. The histopathology of the resected specimen was consistent with a gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the stomach (positive for CD 117) with a high risk of malignancy (mitotic count >5/50 high-power fieldand Ki67/Mib1 >10%). The postoperative course was uneventful and treatment with imatinib mesylate began immediately. The patient appears to be disease free after four years.Conclusions: Giant GISTs of the stomach are rare. Surgical resection with curative intent is feasible. The combination of surgical resection and imatinib can provide long-termdisease-free survival. An R0 resection is the best achievable treatment, therefore the patient should be evaluated over time for potential resectability. © 2013 Cappellani et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
2013
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.
Pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11570/3189561
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 12
  • Scopus 19
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 19
social impact