This study aimed to investigate the role of oxidative stress parameters (ROMs, OXY, SHp), the Oxidative Stress index (OSi), and High Mobility Group Box-1 protein (HMGB-1) in canine leishmaniosis (CanL). For this study, thirty dogs, naturally infected with Leishmania spp. (Leishmania Group, LEISH) and ten healthy adult dogs (control group, CTR) were included. The diagnosis of CanL was performed by a cytological examination of lymph nodes, real time polymerase chain reaction on biological tissues (lymph nodes and whole blood), and an immunofluorescence antibody test (IFAT) for the detection of anti-Leishmania antibodies associated with clinical signs such as dermatitis, lymphadenopathy, onychogryphosis, weight loss, cachexia, lameness, conjunctivitis, epistaxis, and hepatosplenomegaly. The HMGB-1 and oxidative stress parameters of the LEISH Group were compared with the values recorded in the CTR group (Mann Whitney Test, p < 0.05). Spearman rank correlation was applied to evaluate the correlation between the HMGB-1, oxidative stress biomarkers, hematological and biochemical parameters in the LEISH Group. Results showed statistically significant higher values of SHp in the LEISH Group. Specific correlation between the ROMs and the number of red blood cells, and between HGMB-1 and SHp were recorded. These preliminary data may suggest the potential role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of CanL. Further studies are undoubtedly required to evaluate the direct correlation between inflammation parameters with the different stages of CanL. Similarly, further research should investigate the role of ROMs in the onset of anemia.

Clinical Significance of ROMs, OXY, SHp and HMGB-1 in Canine Leishmaniosis

Michela Pugliese
Primo
;
Alessandra Sfacteria
Secondo
;
Annastella Falcone;Annamaria Passantino
Ultimo
2021-01-01

Abstract

This study aimed to investigate the role of oxidative stress parameters (ROMs, OXY, SHp), the Oxidative Stress index (OSi), and High Mobility Group Box-1 protein (HMGB-1) in canine leishmaniosis (CanL). For this study, thirty dogs, naturally infected with Leishmania spp. (Leishmania Group, LEISH) and ten healthy adult dogs (control group, CTR) were included. The diagnosis of CanL was performed by a cytological examination of lymph nodes, real time polymerase chain reaction on biological tissues (lymph nodes and whole blood), and an immunofluorescence antibody test (IFAT) for the detection of anti-Leishmania antibodies associated with clinical signs such as dermatitis, lymphadenopathy, onychogryphosis, weight loss, cachexia, lameness, conjunctivitis, epistaxis, and hepatosplenomegaly. The HMGB-1 and oxidative stress parameters of the LEISH Group were compared with the values recorded in the CTR group (Mann Whitney Test, p < 0.05). Spearman rank correlation was applied to evaluate the correlation between the HMGB-1, oxidative stress biomarkers, hematological and biochemical parameters in the LEISH Group. Results showed statistically significant higher values of SHp in the LEISH Group. Specific correlation between the ROMs and the number of red blood cells, and between HGMB-1 and SHp were recorded. These preliminary data may suggest the potential role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of CanL. Further studies are undoubtedly required to evaluate the direct correlation between inflammation parameters with the different stages of CanL. Similarly, further research should investigate the role of ROMs in the onset of anemia.
2021
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11570/3192829
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