Inhaled glucocorticoids (GCs) are drugs widely used as treatment for asthma patients. They prevent the recruitment and activation of lung immune and inflammatory cells and, moreover, have profound effects on airway structural cells to reverse the effects of disease on airway inflammation. GCs bind to a specific receptor, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), which is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily and modulates pro- and anti-inflammatory gene transcription through a number of distinct and complementary mechanisms. Targets genes include many pro-inflammatory mediators such as chemokines, cytokines, growth factors and their receptors. Inhaled GCs are very effective for most asthma patients with little, if any, systemic side effects depending upon the dose. However, some patients show poor asthma control even after the administration of high doses of topical or even systemic GCs. Several mechanisms relating to inflammation have been considered to be responsible for the onset of the relative GC resistance observed in these patients. In these patients, the side-effect profile of GCs prevent continued use of high doses and new drugs are needed. Targeting the defective pathways associated with GC function in these patients may also reactivate GC responsiveness.

Corticosteroid resistance in asthma: Cellular and molecular mechanisms

Caramori G.
Primo
;
2022-01-01

Abstract

Inhaled glucocorticoids (GCs) are drugs widely used as treatment for asthma patients. They prevent the recruitment and activation of lung immune and inflammatory cells and, moreover, have profound effects on airway structural cells to reverse the effects of disease on airway inflammation. GCs bind to a specific receptor, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), which is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily and modulates pro- and anti-inflammatory gene transcription through a number of distinct and complementary mechanisms. Targets genes include many pro-inflammatory mediators such as chemokines, cytokines, growth factors and their receptors. Inhaled GCs are very effective for most asthma patients with little, if any, systemic side effects depending upon the dose. However, some patients show poor asthma control even after the administration of high doses of topical or even systemic GCs. Several mechanisms relating to inflammation have been considered to be responsible for the onset of the relative GC resistance observed in these patients. In these patients, the side-effect profile of GCs prevent continued use of high doses and new drugs are needed. Targeting the defective pathways associated with GC function in these patients may also reactivate GC responsiveness.
2022
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11570/3212965
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