Background: Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) often suffer from obstetric complications not necessarily associated with the antiphospholipid syndrome. These events may potentially result from the reduced placental synthesis of the fusogenic proteins syncytin-1 and syncytin-2, observed in women with pregnancy-related disorders. SLE patients have an aberrant noncoding (nc)RNA signature that may in turn dysregulate the expression of syncytin-1 and syncytin- 2 during placentation. The aim of this research is to computationally evaluate and characterize the interaction between syncytin-1 and syncytin-2 genes and human ncRNAs and to discuss the potential implications for SLE pregnancy adverse outcomes. Methods: The FASTA sequences of the syncytin-1 and syncytin-2 genes were used as inputs to the Ensembl.org library to find any alignments with human ncRNA genes and their transcripts, which were characterized for their tissue expression, regulatory activity on adjacent genes, biological pathways, and potential association with human disease. Results: BLASTN analysis revealed a total of 100 hits with human long ncRNAs (lncRNAs) for the syncytin-1 and syncytin-2 genes, with median alignment scores of 151 and 66.7, respectively. Only lncRNAs TP53TG1, TTTY14, and ENSG00000273328 were reported to be expressed in placental tissue. Dysregulated expression of lncRNAs TP53TG1, LINC01239, and LINC01320 found in this analysis has previously been described in SLE patients as well as in women with a high-risk pregnancy. In addition, some of the genes adjacent to lncRNAs aligned with syncytin- 1 or syncytin-2 in a regulatory region might increase the risk of pregnancy complications or SLE. Conclusions: This is the first computational study showing alignments between syncytin-1 and syncytin-2 genes and human lncRNAs. Whether this mechanism affects syncytiotrophoblast morphogenesis in SLE females is unknown and requires further investigation.

Interaction between Long Noncoding RNAs and Syncytin-1/Syncytin-2 Genes and Transcripts: How Noncoding RNAs May Affect Pregnancy in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

rossella talotta
Ultimo
2023-01-01

Abstract

Background: Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) often suffer from obstetric complications not necessarily associated with the antiphospholipid syndrome. These events may potentially result from the reduced placental synthesis of the fusogenic proteins syncytin-1 and syncytin-2, observed in women with pregnancy-related disorders. SLE patients have an aberrant noncoding (nc)RNA signature that may in turn dysregulate the expression of syncytin-1 and syncytin- 2 during placentation. The aim of this research is to computationally evaluate and characterize the interaction between syncytin-1 and syncytin-2 genes and human ncRNAs and to discuss the potential implications for SLE pregnancy adverse outcomes. Methods: The FASTA sequences of the syncytin-1 and syncytin-2 genes were used as inputs to the Ensembl.org library to find any alignments with human ncRNA genes and their transcripts, which were characterized for their tissue expression, regulatory activity on adjacent genes, biological pathways, and potential association with human disease. Results: BLASTN analysis revealed a total of 100 hits with human long ncRNAs (lncRNAs) for the syncytin-1 and syncytin-2 genes, with median alignment scores of 151 and 66.7, respectively. Only lncRNAs TP53TG1, TTTY14, and ENSG00000273328 were reported to be expressed in placental tissue. Dysregulated expression of lncRNAs TP53TG1, LINC01239, and LINC01320 found in this analysis has previously been described in SLE patients as well as in women with a high-risk pregnancy. In addition, some of the genes adjacent to lncRNAs aligned with syncytin- 1 or syncytin-2 in a regulatory region might increase the risk of pregnancy complications or SLE. Conclusions: This is the first computational study showing alignments between syncytin-1 and syncytin-2 genes and human lncRNAs. Whether this mechanism affects syncytiotrophoblast morphogenesis in SLE females is unknown and requires further investigation.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11570/3248969
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