Robertsonian translocation 1;29 (rob(1;29)), a widespread chromosomal anomaly affecting cattle fertility, appears to have originated from a common ancestor. This study utilizes routine SNP data to investigate the chromosomal region associated with rob(1;29) and confirm the presence of a shared haplotype among carriers in diverse Italian breeds. Three datasets were employed: Dataset 1 included 151 subjects from 5 beef cattle breeds genotyped with the GGP Bovine 33 k SNP chip; Dataset 2 encompassed 800 subjects from 32 Italian breeds genotyped with the Illumina 50 k SNP chip, sourced from the BOVITA dataset; Dataset 3 combined Dataset 2 with 21 karyologically tested subjects from breeds with a high carrier frequency, genotyped using the Affymetrix 65 K SNP chip. FST analysis pinpointed a distinctive genomic region on the first six Mb of BTA29, the centromeric region involved in the translocation. Haplotype comparisons within this non-recombining region revealed a common haplotype shared among all carriers, supporting the theory of a common ancestor. Principal component and haplotype analysis allowed clear differentiation of rob(1;29) homozygous and heterozygous carriers. Expanding to Dataset 2 revealed rob(1;29) carriers in unexpected breeds, all sharing the same ancestral haplotype. Notably, previously untested breeds, including Cinisara, exhibited a high carrier prevalence (nearly 50%), confirmed by karyological analysis. This study validates the presence of a shared haplotype among all identified rob(1;29) carriers, reinforcing the common ancestor theory as the origin of this translocation's spread throughout the cattle population. Furthermore, it underscores the potential of SNP data analysis as a rapid, accurate, and cost-effective tool for broad rob(1;29) screening, given the translocation's consistent nature across all analyzed breeds.

Identification of a common haplotype in carriers of rob(1;29) in 32 Italian cattle breeds

Liotta L.;
2024-01-01

Abstract

Robertsonian translocation 1;29 (rob(1;29)), a widespread chromosomal anomaly affecting cattle fertility, appears to have originated from a common ancestor. This study utilizes routine SNP data to investigate the chromosomal region associated with rob(1;29) and confirm the presence of a shared haplotype among carriers in diverse Italian breeds. Three datasets were employed: Dataset 1 included 151 subjects from 5 beef cattle breeds genotyped with the GGP Bovine 33 k SNP chip; Dataset 2 encompassed 800 subjects from 32 Italian breeds genotyped with the Illumina 50 k SNP chip, sourced from the BOVITA dataset; Dataset 3 combined Dataset 2 with 21 karyologically tested subjects from breeds with a high carrier frequency, genotyped using the Affymetrix 65 K SNP chip. FST analysis pinpointed a distinctive genomic region on the first six Mb of BTA29, the centromeric region involved in the translocation. Haplotype comparisons within this non-recombining region revealed a common haplotype shared among all carriers, supporting the theory of a common ancestor. Principal component and haplotype analysis allowed clear differentiation of rob(1;29) homozygous and heterozygous carriers. Expanding to Dataset 2 revealed rob(1;29) carriers in unexpected breeds, all sharing the same ancestral haplotype. Notably, previously untested breeds, including Cinisara, exhibited a high carrier prevalence (nearly 50%), confirmed by karyological analysis. This study validates the presence of a shared haplotype among all identified rob(1;29) carriers, reinforcing the common ancestor theory as the origin of this translocation's spread throughout the cattle population. Furthermore, it underscores the potential of SNP data analysis as a rapid, accurate, and cost-effective tool for broad rob(1;29) screening, given the translocation's consistent nature across all analyzed breeds.
2024
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11570/3286194
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