There is evidence that chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is associated with an increased risk of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) development, and it has been hypothesized an etiological role of HBV in the development of this tumor. Very little is known about occult HBV infection (OBI) in ICC. Aims of the study were to investigate the OBI prevalence and to characterize the HBV molecular status atintrahepatic level in OBI-positive cases with ICC. Frozen liver tumor specimens from 47 HBV surface-antigen-negative patients with ICC and 41 paired non-tumor liver tissues were tested for OBI by 4 different HBV-specific nested PCR. Covalently closed circular HBV DNA (HBV cccDNA) and viral integrations were investigated in OBI-positive cases. HBV DNA was detected in tumor and/or non-tumor specimens from 29/47 (61.7%) ICC patients. HBV cccDNA was found in tissues from 5/17 (34.5%) cases examined. HBV integration was detected in 4/10 (40%) tumor tissues tested and involved HBx and HBV-core gene sequences in 3 and 1 cases, respectively. Viral integration occurred: (a) 9,367 nucleotides upstream of the cat-eye-syndrome critical region protein-5-isoform coding sequence; (b) within the cystinosin isoform-1-precursor gene; (c) within the thromboxane-A-synthase-1 gene; (d) within the ATPase phospholipid transporting 9B gene. Occult HBV infection is highly prevalent in patients with ICC. Both free viral genomes and integrated HBV DNA can be present in these cases. These results suggest an involvement of HBV in the carcinogenic process leading to ICC development even in cases with occult infection.

Free episomal and integrated HBV DNA In HBsAg-negative patients with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

Pollicino t
Primo
;
Musolino c;Saitta c;Tripodi g;Lanza m;Raffa g;Barbera a;Navarra g;and Raimondo G
Ultimo
2019

Abstract

There is evidence that chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is associated with an increased risk of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) development, and it has been hypothesized an etiological role of HBV in the development of this tumor. Very little is known about occult HBV infection (OBI) in ICC. Aims of the study were to investigate the OBI prevalence and to characterize the HBV molecular status atintrahepatic level in OBI-positive cases with ICC. Frozen liver tumor specimens from 47 HBV surface-antigen-negative patients with ICC and 41 paired non-tumor liver tissues were tested for OBI by 4 different HBV-specific nested PCR. Covalently closed circular HBV DNA (HBV cccDNA) and viral integrations were investigated in OBI-positive cases. HBV DNA was detected in tumor and/or non-tumor specimens from 29/47 (61.7%) ICC patients. HBV cccDNA was found in tissues from 5/17 (34.5%) cases examined. HBV integration was detected in 4/10 (40%) tumor tissues tested and involved HBx and HBV-core gene sequences in 3 and 1 cases, respectively. Viral integration occurred: (a) 9,367 nucleotides upstream of the cat-eye-syndrome critical region protein-5-isoform coding sequence; (b) within the cystinosin isoform-1-precursor gene; (c) within the thromboxane-A-synthase-1 gene; (d) within the ATPase phospholipid transporting 9B gene. Occult HBV infection is highly prevalent in patients with ICC. Both free viral genomes and integrated HBV DNA can be present in these cases. These results suggest an involvement of HBV in the carcinogenic process leading to ICC development even in cases with occult infection.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11570/3161619
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