Background: Adherence to vaccinations is unsatisfactory in the inflammatory diseases (IBD) population because of concerns regarding adverse events or low perception of infectious risk. The aim of this study was to maximise adherence to anti-Covid-19 vaccination in IBD patients. Methods: In the third trimester of 2020, all IBD patients were informed concerning the need for anti-Covid-19 vaccination and family physicians were advised to proceed with anti-Influenza and anti-pneumococcus vaccinations. Demographic data, disease-related data together with acceptance of vaccinations were recorded. From May 2021, vaccinations of IBD patients were directly arranged at our hospital. We registered performance, procrastination or denial of anti-Covid-19 vaccination, type of vaccine and adverse events. Results: Five hundred and twenty-three patients were included (Crohn's: 266, ulcerative colitis: 257; M/F 289/234; mean age 48 ± 17 years); 53 patients were excluded from analysis as they became infected with SARS-CoV-2 during the study period; overall adherence to vaccination was 400/470 (85%), procrastinators 44 (9%) and 27 patients (6%) refused. Compared with influenza (58%) and pneumococcus (65%) vaccinations, acceptance was higher for anti-Covid-19 vaccination (P < 0.0001, both). Mild adverse events occurred in 31% and two (0.5%) needed precautionary but uneventful hospitalization. On multiple stepwise regression analysis, factors positively associated with adherence to vaccination were age (P < 0.039; OR, 1.016, 95% CI: 1.001-1.031) and previous anti-influenza vaccination (P < 0.008; OR, 2.071, 95% CI: 1.210-3.545). Conclusions: Direct counselling and on-site administration were associated with a satisfactory acceptance of anti-Covid-19 vaccination, whereas vaccinations against influenza and pneumococcus remained below expected levels. Increased risk perception may account for the observed differences.

Predictors of Covid-19 vaccination acceptance in IBD patients: a prospective study

Viola, Anna
;
Muscianisi, Marco;Alibrandi, Angela;Fries, Walter
2021-01-01

Abstract

Background: Adherence to vaccinations is unsatisfactory in the inflammatory diseases (IBD) population because of concerns regarding adverse events or low perception of infectious risk. The aim of this study was to maximise adherence to anti-Covid-19 vaccination in IBD patients. Methods: In the third trimester of 2020, all IBD patients were informed concerning the need for anti-Covid-19 vaccination and family physicians were advised to proceed with anti-Influenza and anti-pneumococcus vaccinations. Demographic data, disease-related data together with acceptance of vaccinations were recorded. From May 2021, vaccinations of IBD patients were directly arranged at our hospital. We registered performance, procrastination or denial of anti-Covid-19 vaccination, type of vaccine and adverse events. Results: Five hundred and twenty-three patients were included (Crohn's: 266, ulcerative colitis: 257; M/F 289/234; mean age 48 ± 17 years); 53 patients were excluded from analysis as they became infected with SARS-CoV-2 during the study period; overall adherence to vaccination was 400/470 (85%), procrastinators 44 (9%) and 27 patients (6%) refused. Compared with influenza (58%) and pneumococcus (65%) vaccinations, acceptance was higher for anti-Covid-19 vaccination (P < 0.0001, both). Mild adverse events occurred in 31% and two (0.5%) needed precautionary but uneventful hospitalization. On multiple stepwise regression analysis, factors positively associated with adherence to vaccination were age (P < 0.039; OR, 1.016, 95% CI: 1.001-1.031) and previous anti-influenza vaccination (P < 0.008; OR, 2.071, 95% CI: 1.210-3.545). Conclusions: Direct counselling and on-site administration were associated with a satisfactory acceptance of anti-Covid-19 vaccination, whereas vaccinations against influenza and pneumococcus remained below expected levels. Increased risk perception may account for the observed differences.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11570/3220944
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