In recent years, the presence of pharmaceuticals and microplastics (MPs) in aquatic ecosystems has raised concerns about their environmental impact. This study explores the combined effects of caffeine, a common pharmaceutical pollutant, and MPs on the marine mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. Caffeine, at concentrations of 20.0 μg L À1 , and MPs (1 mg L À1 , 35-50 μm size range), was used to mimic real-world exposure scenarios. Two hundred M. galloprovincialis specimens were divided into four groups: caffeine, MPs, Mix (caffeine + MPs), and Control. After a two-week acclimation period, the mollusks were subjected to these pollutants in oxygen-aerated aquariums under controlled conditions for 14 days. Histopathological assessments were performed to evaluate gill morphology. Cellular volume regulation and digestive gland cell viability were also analyzed. Exposure to caffeine and MPs induced significant morphological changes in M. galloprovincialis gills, including cilia loss, ciliary disk damage, and cellular alterations. The chitinous rod supporting filaments also suffered damage, potentially due to MP interactions, leading to hemocyte infiltration and filament integrity compromise. Hemocytic aggregation suggested an inflammatory response to caffeine. In addition, viability assessments of digestive gland cells revealed potential damage to cell membranes and function, with impaired cell volume regulation, particularly in the Mix group, raising concerns about nutrient metabolism disruption and organ function compromise. These findings underscore the vulnerability of M. galloprovincialis to environmental pollutants and emphasize the need for monitoring and mitigation efforts.

The odd couple: Caffeine and microplastics. Morphological and physiological changes in Mytilus galloprovincialis

Impellitteri F.;Briglia M.;Porcino C.
;
Germanà A.;Piccione G.;Faggio C.;Guerrera M. C.
2024-01-01

Abstract

In recent years, the presence of pharmaceuticals and microplastics (MPs) in aquatic ecosystems has raised concerns about their environmental impact. This study explores the combined effects of caffeine, a common pharmaceutical pollutant, and MPs on the marine mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. Caffeine, at concentrations of 20.0 μg L À1 , and MPs (1 mg L À1 , 35-50 μm size range), was used to mimic real-world exposure scenarios. Two hundred M. galloprovincialis specimens were divided into four groups: caffeine, MPs, Mix (caffeine + MPs), and Control. After a two-week acclimation period, the mollusks were subjected to these pollutants in oxygen-aerated aquariums under controlled conditions for 14 days. Histopathological assessments were performed to evaluate gill morphology. Cellular volume regulation and digestive gland cell viability were also analyzed. Exposure to caffeine and MPs induced significant morphological changes in M. galloprovincialis gills, including cilia loss, ciliary disk damage, and cellular alterations. The chitinous rod supporting filaments also suffered damage, potentially due to MP interactions, leading to hemocyte infiltration and filament integrity compromise. Hemocytic aggregation suggested an inflammatory response to caffeine. In addition, viability assessments of digestive gland cells revealed potential damage to cell membranes and function, with impaired cell volume regulation, particularly in the Mix group, raising concerns about nutrient metabolism disruption and organ function compromise. These findings underscore the vulnerability of M. galloprovincialis to environmental pollutants and emphasize the need for monitoring and mitigation efforts.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11570/3285190
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